Oral health tips during the holidays

Holiday dental care Holidays is time to celebrate, a time of joy and cheer. It’s also a time to watch your  health has well. Not talking just your general health but also your oral health during the  holidays. Here is some tips for your oral health tips during the holidays.

Enamel is the top layer of the tooth and is the hardest substance found in the body. The  enamel is what protects the inner part of your tooth. When enamel is weakened, your  tooth can become more susceptible to problems, including cracking and breaking. So  cracking open certain things in your moth may not be a good idea. Accidentally biting  down on small, hard objects—such as candy canes, chocolate coins, ice cubes, or food  decorations—can cause a cracked tooth. This even includes nuts. Although protein  found in nuts helps keep muscles and bones strong, you shouldn’t test the strength of  your teeth by shelling nuts with them. The hard surface of most nutshells can cause  serious tooth and gum damage, and may even crack teeth. The best idea is to shell nuts  before snacking on them.

While enjoying seasonal holiday foods and drinks, be careful when eating or drinking  anything overly acidic, sugary, or sticky. Acidic foods and drinks, such as citrus fruits  and juices, wine, soft drinks, and sweetened mixed drinks, can cause enamel erosion over time. Sip beverages through a straw to minimize exposure of the acids to the tooth enamel. Also,sticky toffees and candy can loosen or even remove fillings and crowns so limit yourself on how much you put in your mouth.

Even though you’re excited to rip into that gift from your special someone, but your teeth are not scissors, openers or any other tool. Gripping a package or stubborn bottle cap with your teeth can crack them, possibly requiring a root canal procedure and a crown for repair. Give your mouth a great gift – reach for scissors or a bottle opener instead.

Chewing gum is a great oral-health-on-the-go tip! Bringing sugar-free gum with you has multiple benefits. You can get that great holiday peppermint taste and make your breath smell fresh. The gum can help remove food that may be stuck in your teeth as well, acting as a secondary toothbrush.

So when your out or at home, celebrating the holidays, give a little care to not only your general health but your oral health as well. You will save yourself headache and pain going into the new year.

 

 

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

Posted in Dental Care

Periodontal disease linked to increased risk of kidney disease

In a study of blacks with normal kidney function, those with severe periodontal disease developed chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 4 times the rate of those without severe periodontal disease. The study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2014 November 11-16 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA.

Periodontal disease is a chronic bacterial infection of the oral cavity, and it disproportionately affects African Americans. It’s also been implicated as a potential risk factor for CKD. To investigate this potential link, researchers led by Vanessa Grubbs, MD (University of California, San Francisco) analyzed 699 African American adults who underwent complete dental examinations.
During an average follow-up of 4.8 years, there were 21 (3.0%) new CKD cases. Participants with severe periodontal disease had a 4.2-fold greater incidence of CKD after adjusting for various factors (age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and income) compared with those without severe periodontal disease.
“Because periodontal disease is common and can be prevented and treated, targeting it may be an important path towards reducing existing racial and ethnic disparities in chronic and end-stage kidney disease,” said Dr. Grubbs.

This is another example of how poor dental health that leads to periodontal disease effects more than just oral health. periodontal disease is linked now with kidney disease as well as high blood pressure, heart attack and more. Do not ignore early warning signs of periodontal disease.  Make sure you keep your regular check ups with your dentist.

 

American Society of Nephrology (ASN). (2014, November 14). Periodontal disease linked to increased risk of kidney disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 7, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141114124309.htm

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

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Location of oral cancers differs in smokers, nonsmokers

Oral Cancer The location of oral cancers differed in smokers and nonsmokers with nonsmokers having a higher proportion of cancers occur on  the edge of the tongue, according to a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

Researcher Brendan J. Perry, B.Sc. M.B.B.S, of the Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, and fellow co-authors sought  to examine whether oral cavity cancers occurred more commonly at sites of dental trauma and how that varied between nonsmokers  without major identified carcinogens and smokers. Their study was an analysis of patients with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancers  seen at an Australian hospital between 2001 and 2011.

After 157 patients were excluded, the study included 724 patients of whom 334 had oropharyngeal cancer and 390 had oral cavity  cancer. Of the 334 patients with oropharyngeal cancer, 48 were lifelong nonsmokers, 266 current smokers and 20 former smokers.  Of the 390 patients with mouth cancer, 87 were lifelong nonsmokers, 276 current smokers and 27 former smokers. The average age  at diagnosis was 60 years old for oropharyngeal cancer and almost 62 years old for mouth cancer. Out of the two sexes, the cancers  were more common in men

Results show that oral cancers occurred on the lateral (edge of) tongue in 57 nonsmokers (66 percent) compared with 107 smokers/former smokers (33 percent). The edge of the tongue was the most common site of tumors in both smokers and nonsmokers, though it was proportionally more common in nonsmokers. The authors suggest if chronic dental trauma is a carcinogen, it would be expected that a high incidence of mouth cancer would occur near teeth, especially on the edge of the tongue or the buccal mucosa (the inside lining of the cheeks).

“We acknowledge that this study does not prove that chronic dental trauma causes cancer. … Our data support the limited evidence from the small number of previous studies that recognized a potential role of chronic dental irritation in carcinogenesis,” the authors conclude.

 

The JAMA Network Journals. (2014, November 6). Location of oral cancers differs in smokers, nonsmokers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141106165619.htm

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

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Posted in Dental Problems, Oral Health, Throat and Oral Cancer

Invisalign ® Versus Incognito ® Hidden Braces

Incognito Braces

In the treatment of trying  to straightening  teeth discreetly where it is barley visible to the eye, Incognito® Hidden Braces and Invisalign® are both popular and well-known methods of dental treatment. Incognito® Hidden Braces use a custom-designed bracket and wire system bonded to the back of the teeth, while Invisalign® uses a series of clear plastic aligners to achieve desired results. While both options are popular, they differ in terms of the problems they can treat, their impacts on your lifestyle, and their maintenance. By learning more about these two options, you can make an informed decision about which is right for you.

What type of dental problems do these treatment methods treat?

 

The type or types of dental problems that you need corrected will be a major factor in choosing between Incognito® Hidden Braces for adults and Invisalign®. Invisalign® is best meant for mild cases of protruding or crooked teeth, and this method has been successful at correcting minor cases of overcrowding, large gaps, and bite issues. Incognito® Hidden Braces can correct these same minor problems, they are also effective at addressing more complex dental issues that Invisalign® is not able to handle. Additionally, Invisalign® moves the teeth at a slower and more gradual pace, while lingual braces produce a more controlled force that yields highly successful results.

Braces’  Impact on Daily life

Incognito®  Hidden Braces are bonded to the back of your teeth, just like traditional braces, and cannot be removed for the duration of your treatment. Due to this, you may have to adjust your diet to less sticky foods.  You can remove Invisalign® aligners during meal times, and when you’re brushing your teeth. Many may consider this convenient, but let’s reconsider that.  If you remove your tray to brush your teeth and then forget to put it back in for a day or more. One more day added to your treatment time! Also, think about having to excuse yourself during a business luncheon or a date to remove your Invisalign®.  That is like having to excuse yourself to remove dentures.  Also there is always the distinct possibility of accidently throwing them in the trash.

Last thoughts on Invisalign ® Versus Incognito ® Hidden Braces

Invisalign® aligner trays are made of a clear plastic and are relatively hard to see yet even clear plastic reflects light, and most people can tell the difference between your naked teeth, and teeth behind a plastic tray. Incognito®, on the other hand, cannot be seen at all under normal circumstances.

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

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Posted in Cosmentic Dentistry, Dental Care, General Dentistry

Dental anxiety leads cause for moderate sedation in sedation dentistry

sedation Dentistry

Dental anxiety for some can be so sever that they prefer to have sedation dentistry, which is for the patient to have a light sedative in order for them to have dental work done. For a master’s thesis in endodontics, Madhavi Setty, DDS, MSD, set out to understand how dental specialties like endodontics for root canals, periodontics to treat gum disease and oral surgery for extractions and corrective surgeries used moderate sedations in their different specialties. Setty’s findings were reported in the Journal of Endodontics article: “An Analysis of Moderate Sedation Protocols Used in Dental Specialty Programs: A Retrospective Observational Study.”

Moderate sedation allows the patient to remain conscious while still being able to communicate with the dentist. The findings came from a retrospective study of 84 patients, who received care and moderate sedation during a visit to a Case Western Reserve’s dental clinics in endodontics, periodontics and oral surgery graduate programs between 2010 and 2012. The study also looked at each patient’s age, sex and existing medical conditions, like high blood pressure, heart trouble or diabetes, that require consideration during treatments. Patients ranged in age from age 8 to 88; their average age was 45. Most (63 percent) were women.The study is find the patients reasoning for requesting the sedation. Researchers found moderate sedation was primarily used to calm anxiety in more than half of the patients (54 percent), followed by fear of needles (15 percent), local anesthesia failures (15 percent) and severe gag reflex and claustrophobia from the rubber dam (both 8 percent). While moderate sedation helps to calm anxious patients, the catch is that not all endodontists are qualified to administer it. The procedure is not generally taught in most graduate endodontic programs, Montagnese said.

The Department of Endodontics at Case Western Reserve introduced training for moderate sedation into its curriculum last year. The study provides a guideline to when its best to use moderate sedation, Montagnese said.

Material From http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141014114654.htm

Journal Reference:

  1. Madhavi Setty, Thomas A. Montagnese, Dale Baur, Anita Aminoshariae, Andre Mickel. An Analysis of Moderate Sedation Protocols Used in Dental Specialty Programs: A Retrospective Observational StudyJournal of Endodontics, 2014; 40 (9): 1327 DOI: 1016/j.joen.2014.05.015

 

 

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

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New Stem Cell Research Could Be The Key Toward Teeth Restoration

stem-cell

stem-cell

Stem cells are the building blocks that build all our tissue in the body and could be the key toward teeth restoration. Finding reserves of stems cells in the body has been a task all onto it’s self. Now a new reserve has been found in the nerves of teeth as found by Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden .

“We have identified a previously unknown type of stem cells that surprisingly enough belong to the nerves of the tooth; these are nerves that would normally be associated with the tooth’s extreme sensitivity to pain,” said Kaj Fried at the Department of Neuroscience, one of the head researchers responsible for the study.

(biosciencetechnology.com)

Inside the center of the tooth is the living part known as the pulp. This region contains blood vessels, nerves from the gums, and cells that contribute to the structure and health of the tooth. If the tooth becomes damaged, these cells get to work making restorative tissues. However, researchers have failed to understand where these stem cells originate. Through mapping of tooth formation in mice, they discovered the nerves are actually the source of the stem cells.

The researchers discovered that young cells, which at first are part of the neural support cells, or the glial cells, leave the nerves at an early stage of the fetal development. The cells change their identity and become both connective tissues in the tooth pulp and odontoblasts, i.e., the cells that produce the hard dentin underneath the enamel.

Though currently we do not have the ability to regrow teeth in adults. This research is a good step in changing that fact. The future possibilities for this discovery are almost endless. Using these nerve tissues, it may be possible for scientists to manipulate the stem cells to form new adult teeth. As these teeth will essentially be copies of one’s original teeth, this innovative process may replace veneers and other restorative processes as the best form of teeth restoration.

There is still a lot of research to be done including identify the chemical signal that induces the glial cells into reversion. Yet this signals an extraordinary time in stem cell and dental research with a bright future.

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

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Poor dental hygiene can lead to more than just bad breath

dental hygiene

dental hygiene

Poor dental hygiene can lead to more than just bad breath and tooth decay. Not brushing your teeth could also have consequences for more serious illnesses.

Alzheimer’s disease & Dementia

In 2010, researchers from New York University (NYU) concluded that there is a link between gum inflammation and Alzheimer’s disease, after reviewing 20 years of data on the association.

However, the number of participants in the NYU study was fairly small. The researchers analyzed data from 152 subjects enrolled in the Glostrop Aging Study – a study looking at psychological, medical and oral health in Danish men and women. The study spanned a 20-year period and ended in 1984, when the subjects were all over the age of 70.

Comparing cognitive function at ages 50 and 70, the NYU team found that gum disease at the age of 70 was strongly associated with low scores for cognitive function. ( medicalnewstoday.com)

Also, July 31, 2013 — Poor dental health and gum disease may be linked to Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, a new study from the University of Central Lancashire School of Medicine and Dentistry suggests.

Although past studies have suggested a link between oral health and dementia, this is the first to pinpoint a specific gum disease bacteria in the brain.

Researchers looked at donated brain samples of 10 people without dementia and 10 people with dementia. They found the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis in the brains of four of those with dementia. (WebMD )

Pancreatic cancer

A team at Brown University, think gum disease may one day help identify people at greater risk.

Gum disease, which affects nearly half of all Americans, has been linked to stroke, diabetes and other ailments. The American Heart Association has disputed the notion that the association is causal, but some researchers speculate that poor gum health may give rise to chronic inflammation that promotes the growth of cancer cells.

In a recent study published in the journal Gut, the Brown researchers compared 405 people with pancreatic cancer and 416 who did not have the disease. The scientists found that higher levels of antibodies to P. gingivalis, a bacterium that plays a role in gum disease, were twice as common in people with pancreatic cancer.

To be sure, the research showed only an association, not a causal relationship. But other studies have also found intriguing results. One at Harvard found that men with poor gum health had a 63 percent higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer . (nytimes.com)

Poor dental hygiene has links to these and other diseases. So when you deciede not to take care of your teeth, it’s not just your smile neglecting, but your neglecting your health as well.

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

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Dentists and dental associations don’t agree with what’s the best way to brush teeth

If you asked people what is the best way to brush your teeth, you would get a wide variety of answers. Seems the answers are just was varied between dentists as well.

For the study published in the British Dental Journal on Aug. 8, a team of researchers from the University College London (UCL) examined the recommendations provided by dental associations, dental textbooks, as well as toothpaste and toothbrush companies on the best way to brush the teeth.

The researchers observed that there was lack of agreement on the recommended brushing techniques, frequency of brushing, and for how long. They also found that brushing recommendations for adults and children differed as well.

“In this study we found an unacceptably inconsistent array of advice from different sources,” said study author Aubrey Sheiham, from the UCL. “Most worryingly, the methods recommended by dental associations are not the same as the best ones mentioned in dental textbooks.” For one, no particular brushing method has been proven to be better than another. Study author and practicing dentist John Wainwright attributed the wide range of recommended brushing techniques to the lack of evidence that could show one method is better than the other.

The researchers, however, raised concern that the discrepancies over the proper way of brushing the teeth are something to be concerned about. Sheiham said that the public should get sound information on the best way to brush the teeth. She said that people would be confused on how to brush their teeth properly if they hear varying recommendations from a dental association, dentist and toothbrush companies.

Given the different and conflicting recommendations from dental experts, the researchers said that there is a need for a research that would assess the effectiveness of different brushing methods.

The ADA website has two minute videos to help your kids know when to stop. Even if you use an electric toothbrush, it is important to take your time, and never brush too hard or too quickly – it can damage both the gums and the tooth structure right at the gum line.

The nylon-bristled toothbrush most of us use was invented in 1938. The authors of the new study say it is about time there are more consistent guidelines on how to use it.

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

Posted in Dental Care, General Dentistry

Depression Drugs Could Lead to Dental Implant Failure

People who get dental implants may have to not only be careful about the physical health medications they take, but also the metal health medications as well. The International and American Associations for Dental Research (IADR/AADR) have published a paper titled "SSRIs and the Risk of Osseointegrated Implant Failure -- A Cohort Study. " Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), the most widely used drugs for the treatment of depression, have been reported to reduce bone formation and increase the risk of bone fracture. Since osseointegration is influenced by bone metabolism, this study investigates the association between SSRIs and the risk of failures in osseointegrated implants. his retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients treated with dental implants from January 2007 to January 2013. A total of 916 dental implants in 490 patients (94 implants on 51 patients using SSRIs) were used to estimate the risk of failure associated with the use of SSRIs. Data analysis involved cox proportional hazards, generalized estimating equations models and Kaplan-Meier analysis. After three to 67 months of follow-up, 38 dental implants failed and 784 succeeded in nonusers group while 10 failed and 84 succeeded in SSRIs-users group. The primary outcome was that compared with non-users of SSRIs, SSRIs usage was associated with an increased risk of dental implants failure (HR= 2∙31; P< 0∙01). The failure rates were 4.6% for SSRI non-users and 10.6% SSRI users, respectively. The secondary outcomes were that small implant diameters (≤4mm) (P=0∙01), bone augmentation (P=0∙04) and smoking habits (P<0∙01) also seemed to be associated with higher risk of implant failure. The main limitation of this retrospective study was that drug compliance dose and treatment period could not be acquired from the files of the patients. Within the limits of this study, these findings indicate that treatment with SSRIs is associated with an increased failure risk of osseointegrated implants. The manuscript, by researchers Khadijeh Al-Abedalla, Samer Abi Nader, Belinda Nicolau, Emad Rastikerdar, Faleh Tamimi and Xixi Wu, from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; and Nach Daniel, from East Coast Oral Surgery, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada, is published in the OnlineFirst portion of the IADR/AADR Journal of Dental Research(JDR). ( Dentistrytoday.com )   In summation, certain anti depressants can deplete the ability for the bone to heal properly after dental implant surgery. This can lead to implant complications or implant faliuers. That is why it is critical that you tell you dentist about any and ALL medications you are taking before dental implant surgery.

People who get dental implants may have to not only be careful about the physical health medications they take, but also the metal health medications as well. The International and American Associations for Dental Research (IADR/AADR) have published a paper titled “SSRIs and the Risk of Osseointegrated Implant Failure — A Cohort Study.

” Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), the most widely used drugs for the treatment of depression, have been reported to reduce bone formation and increase the risk of bone fracture. Since osseointegration is influenced by bone metabolism, this study investigates the association between SSRIs and the risk of failures in osseointegrated implants.

his retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients treated with dental implants from January 2007 to January 2013. A total of 916 dental implants in 490 patients (94 implants on 51 patients using SSRIs) were used to estimate the risk of failure associated with the use of SSRIs. Data analysis involved cox proportional hazards, generalized estimating equations models and Kaplan-Meier analysis. After three to 67 months of follow-up, 38 dental implants failed and 784 succeeded in nonusers group while 10 failed and 84 succeeded in SSRIs-users group.
The primary outcome was that compared with non-users of SSRIs, SSRIs usage was associated with an increased risk of dental implants failure (HR= 2∙31; P< 0∙01). The failure rates were 4.6% for SSRI non-users and 10.6% SSRI users, respectively. The secondary outcomes were that small implant diameters (≤4mm) (P=0∙01), bone augmentation (P=0∙04) and smoking habits (P<0∙01) also seemed to be associated with higher risk of implant failure. The main limitation of this retrospective study was that drug compliance dose and treatment period could not be acquired from the files of the patients.
Within the limits of this study, these findings indicate that treatment with SSRIs is associated with an increased failure risk of osseointegrated implants.
The manuscript, by researchers Khadijeh Al-Abedalla, Samer Abi Nader, Belinda Nicolau, Emad Rastikerdar, Faleh Tamimi and Xixi Wu, from McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; and Nach Daniel, from East Coast Oral Surgery, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada, is published in the OnlineFirst portion of the IADR/AADR Journal of Dental Research(JDR). ( Dentistrytoday.com )

Summation of Dental Implant Failure Study

In summation, certain anti depressants can deplete the ability for the bone to heal properly after dental implant surgery. This can lead to implant complications or implant faliuers. That is why it is critical that you tell you dentist about any and ALL medications you are taking before dental implant surgery.

 

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

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Posted in Dental Care, Dental Implant, General Dentistry

You can’t hide your feelings! Women six times ‘more disgusted by dental treatment’ than men

You can’t hide your feelings!

After looking at pictures of dental treatment scenes, researchers discovered that female patients scared of the dentist were six times more likely to be disgusted with what they saw, compared with non-dental phobic women.

In a battle of the sexes, dental phobic women struggled to hide their emotions. Although both men and woman faired equally when asked about their feelings towards the dentist, women afraid of the dentist were more repulsed than their men counterparts.

Survey data from the Adult Dental Health Survey showed almost half of adults were moderately to extremely afraid of the dentist. With almost 30 million people visiting the dentist, Karen Coates, dental advisor at the British Dental Health Foundation, uses the research to reassure anxious patients that they are not alone and that there are ways make visiting the dentist a manageable experience.

Karen said: ‘The good news is that more and more dentists now understand their patients’ fears, and with a combination of kindness and gentleness can do a great deal to make dental treatment an acceptable, normal part of life. Make sure that the practice knows you are nervous, so that they can help you. You are not alone and your fear will be much less if you share it with your dental team.

‘Dentists are aware many of their patients have some form of anxiety. There are dentists who specialise in treating nervous patients and will make more time for you. Book appointments at a time of day when you feel at your best and when you do not have any other commitments to worry about. Allow plenty of time so that you can get to the practice in a relaxed frame of mind.

‘Agree with your dentist a sign that means ‘stop I need a break’ before the treatment is started. Usually you can just raise your hand, and the treatment can be stopped for a few minutes until you are ready to start again. Once you know that you can control the situation you will feel more confident.  Some people find that listening to music whilst they are having treatment can help. If you are still nervous there are other techniques your dentist can use to help you, such as relaxation and sedation so ask the team about these.

‘Patients anxious of the dentist are, in theory, likely to have poorer oral health than those who get regular check-ups. Even if you are fearful it is important to visit the dentist regularly, as often as they recommend giving them a chance a chance to assess your oral health.  Catching any problems whilst they are still small will mean that the treatment involved is much less and lighter on your pocket too. Truly a case that prevention is better than a cure.  Always remember that you are in charge of your oral health for the rest of the time and brushing, twice a day for two minutes using a fluoride toothpaste, will help to remove plaque – the cause of both decay and gum disease. It is also important to clean in between teeth using interdental brushes or floss.’

Posted from Houston, Texas, United States.

Posted in Cosmentic Dentistry, General Dentistry

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